Scotland Touches the Moon as Priceless Space Rock Collection Goes on Display

Today, a priceless collection of moon rock and lunar dust samples lands in Scotland, on loan from the US Government and NASA. 

The unique collection will be on display at Dundee Science Centre until October as part of its Summer of Space exhibition and is the only one of its kind in Scotland. Across the UK, the collection is one of just two available to the public, outside of London.  

The samples of moon rock and lunar dust were collected during NASA’s manned space missions to the Moon in the late 1960s and early 1970s and are deemed irreplaceable. These priceless wonders are kept locked in a high-tech safe at the Centre, approved following a special security visit prior to the loan.

The collection also includes a range of meteorites, with a number of samples older than the Earth itself. One particular specimen, which visitors can actually hold in their own hands, is thought to be over 4,565 million years old. The meteorite samples have been discovered in countries across the globe, landing on Earth as much as 5,000 years ago.

Commenting on the new arrivals, Louise Smith, CEO of Dundee Science Centre, said:

“We are over the moon to have these samples as part of our summer space exhibition. Being able to get so close, and even touch materials that come from a world beyond our own offers a truly unique experience and really engages visitors like never before.” 

The collection completes Dundee Science Centre’s summer space exhibition, which also features a new planetarium, the One Small Step interactive exhibition and the limited edition Hubble Space Telescope image, released by NASA: one of just 100, the image is unique in Scotland.

ENDS

 

Notes to Editor

Photography Caption: Annabel Hutchison marvels the Imilach meteorite from the collection, which was found in Chile in 1822 and is older than planet Earth itself. 

Additional photography available.

Contact: Debbie Standen
Phone: 0131 470 3400
Email: debbie.standen@porternovelli.co.uk
Website: http://www.sensation.org